Teaching ethics

Why Do Universities Lie About Program Information?

Examining the Ethical Issues I have previously blogged about doctored program information submitted by four prominent universities—Rutgers University, Temple University, Claremont McKenna College, and Iona College. The goal was to make their programs look better to university rating outlets such as U.S. News & World Report. Now, along comes a... Read more →


Why Do Colleges and Universities Report False Data About Their Programs?

The Name of the Game is to Get Higher Rankings A lawsuit charges that Rutgers Business School sought to improve its rankings by creating bogus temporary jobs for graduating MBA students. This isn’t the first time a major university played games with its statistics to make them look better in... Read more →


What Can Be Done About Student Cheating?

Lessons From the Front Lines Perhaps you read last week that David Berkovitz, a Professor at Chapman University in Orange, California, is suing his own students after he discovered that his midterm and final exams had been uploaded to a popular website. Berkovitz, who teaches business law at Chapman University,... Read more →


Teaching Ethics and AI in the Business School Curriculum

Ethics, Accountability, and Risk Analysis Several months ago, a research paper that I had written was published in Strategic Finance. I read it over last night and decided to extract some of the material for today’s blog. AI is transforming the role of accounting and finance professionals in unprecedented ways,... Read more →


Is a UCLA Professor Racist For Refusing to Be Lenient With Give Black Students Following the Death of George Floyd?

What Are the Ethical Issues? A University of California (UCLA) professor, Gordon Klein, who teaches financial analysis, law, and public policy at UCLA, filed a lawsuit on against the University on September 27. He claims UCLA was attempting to depict him as a racist in an attempt to improve the... Read more →


Harvard’s Most Popular Course is a Class on How to be Happier

Can Happiness Be Taught? Dr. Tal Ben-Shahar has taught Harvard University’s most popular course: a course on Positive Psychology; that is, he taught his students how to be happy. The course, called PSY 1504 – Positive Psychology,is described as follows: “The course focuses on the psychological aspects of a fulfilling... Read more →


Paradigm Shift in Ethics Education

Giving Voice to Values The benefits of the Giving Voice to Values approach to ethical decision making is it involves students directly by providing them with the tools to speak out against improper behavior. Rather than a focus on ethical analysis in a sterile way, the GVV curriculum focuses on... Read more →


EDI Courses in Higher Education: Are They Doing Any Good?

Boise State's Experiences Last month it was announced that Boise State University was suspending a course following allegations that the in-class instruction had humiliated and degraded some students over their beliefs and values. The suspension affected roughly 1,300 students in 52 sections of UF 200: Foundations of Ethics and Diversity,... Read more →


Creating an Immersive Experience and Active Participation of Students in E-Learning During COVID-19

Engaging Students With Online Instruction My “Ethics Sage” blog this past Tuesday addressed some of the questions for instructors in preparing to create e-Learning experiences using Zoom. Here are those questions. What techniques are available for E-Learning? What are the limitations of E-Learning? How can we develop and nurture an... Read more →